When people think of a ‘video game’, they tend to imagine one of two things. The first and probably most prolific image is that of an older, 8-bit arcade game with little more than bleeps and bloops for music and sound effects. The second, more modern perception is the hyper-violent shooter, packed with wanton violence and destruction. Both of these conceptualizations are incomplete, and fall short of the emerging notion of games as a form of Computer-Aided Life.

When people think of a ‘video game’, they tend to imagine one of two things. The first and probably most prolific image is that of an older, 8-bit arcade game with little more than bleeps and bloops for music and sound effects. The second, more modern perception is the hyper-violent shooter, packed with wanton violence and destruction. Both of these conceptualizations are incomplete, and fall short of the emerging notion of games as a form of Computer-Aided Life.